“Non ba tam” club preserves folk melodies

Chia sẻ
(VOVworld) – Preserving intangible heritages in the community is very important to uphold cultural values in social life. In recent years, a number clubs of folk song lovers have been established in Vietnam. One example is a club called “Non Ba Tam” (a traditional Vietnamese flat palm hat) in Dong Da district, Hanoi. In this club, all members can exercise their talent and passion for music and contribute to preserving Vietnam's traditional folk melodies.

(VOVworld) – Preserving intangible heritages in the community is very important to uphold cultural values in social life. In recent years, a number clubs of folk song lovers have been established in Vietnam. One example is a club called “Non Ba Tam” (a traditional Vietnamese flat palm hat) in Dong Da district, Hanoi. In this club, all members can exercise their talent and passion for music and contribute to preserving Vietnam's traditional folk melodies.

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More and more people want to learn to sing Quan Ho folk songs

You’re listening to folk melodies from a small stage in the Vuon temple relic site at 106 Phao Dai Lang Street. The tunes have become familiar to local residents. The relic site is a venue for the folk singers of the “Non Ba Tam” club, named after the traditional Vietnamese flat palm hat. For 6 years the club members have gathered every evening to learn folk songs from each other. From here, the folk songs spread among the nearby residents, becoming a popular community activity. Many people, especially the elderly, support the club's performances. The elders of the Vuon temple management board also support the club by providing a stage and loudspeakers for performances. Nguyen Van Tung is Vuon temple's janitor: “The“Non ba tam” Club was founded by Mr. Bui Duc Ken and Mrs. Nguyen Thi Hong Tham, local residents. Most of the club members are also local residents. Some people attend the club every evening, even those who live far away. Since it was established, the club has been growing with every passing day.”

Nguyen Thi Hong Tham, the club’s chairwoman, is a fan of Quan Ho folk singing. At first, she says, she just wanted to get together with people who shared her interest to practice Quan Ho songs for local festivals. But after their successful performances, more and more people wanted to learn to sing Quan Ho folk songs, so Tham decided to establish the “Non Ba Tam” club. Tham recalls: “Initially, the club had only 10 members, most of them are folk music lovers in Lang Thuong Ward. Later, the club’s reputation spread and more people knew about the club. Now folk music lovers around the city come to join the club”.

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Elderly Quan Ho singers (Photo: VNP)

The club now has 50 people between the ages of 35 and 70. They are all passionate with folk music. They also practice other folk singing genres like Cheo (traditional operetta) singing, Cai Luong (reformed theatre), Chau Van (trance singing and dancing), and Xam singing. For some, the club is a place where they can immerse themselves in art. Nguyen Thi Hien is a club member: “I like this Quan Ho folk singing class. I feel very sad when I miss a lesson. I love singing Quan Ho and Cheo”.

Over the past 6 years, the club members have participated in several festivals, art exchanges, and contests and have won a number of prizes. They have traveled to other localities to perform and always receive a warm welcome. With love for fol music every club member wants to preserve folk songs to enrich Viet Nam’s traditional arts. 

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